Gardening

Mites

Mites


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Questions: mites


Last year I planted giant marigold seeds, when the plants came out, I transplanted them into a bigger pot, they had become really beautiful. Unfortunately the leaves began to patter with yellow spots and sprayed water with a nebulizer, I realized which also featured cobwebs. Reading a magazine for plants, I discovered that they were infested with mites, in fact, looking at the underside of the leaf with a magnifying glass, small red and black parasites could be seen. So I started to do anti-mite treatments on the plant, but I couldn't completely eliminate them. This year in the same pot and then in the same earth, I planted iris bulbs, but I noticed that the plant struggles to grow, the leaves have taken on metallic reflections and, looking at them with a magnifying glass, you can see black perassites. I wonder if it is possible that the ground after a year was still infested by mites and if it is the case (given the past experience) to intervene with insecticides, or if it is not better to throw away everything, including bulbs. Thank you, I await your reply.

Mites: Answer: mites


Dear Claudio,
Thank you for contacting us about your questions regarding the mites through the Expert's section of
The mites are small animals with 4 pairs of legs, equipped with sucking mouthparts that they use to suck the lymph to the plant and in the most serious cases they can lead to the complete desiccation of the leaves.
Since they are polyphagous, they feed on any plant species present in the garden.
The tetranychus is the classic Ragnetto Rosso. The mite develops, if the environmental conditions are favorable, all year round. It carries up to 10 generations a year. The female lays 50 to 70 eggs. The presence of mites on its iris, with difficulty growing, is certainly due to the use of the same infected land used the previous year for the marigold.
Yours sincerely.